03:09 pm, normallydistributed
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mizzchelle:

Infectious disease humor. It gets me every time!

mizzchelle:

Infectious disease humor. It gets me every time!


06:55 pm, normallydistributed
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phpeyton:

via xkcd

HAHA! 

phpeyton:

via xkcd

HAHA! 


11:50 pm, normallydistributed
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infectioushealth:

Power of the test, p-values, publication bias and statistical evidence

My favorite:

"Only results below 0.05 are significant." 

"You do realize that the p-value level of 0.05 is arbitrary, right?"

"It is always 0.05." 

Ah statistics. 


11:02 am, normallydistributed
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128 notes
quote
I wonder if it would have been considered acceptable to anchor a medical report on heart disease solely in terms of its costs to employers – to headline a news story on cancer treatment with the words “working days lost to cancer”. I suspect not. While economic reporting on various vaguely defined patient groups is certainly becoming prevalent, I believe both medical professionals and news editors would feel compelled to include a more patient-based approach when reporting on what a friend has astutely called “X-rayable diseases”. I certainly hope they would not dream of telling the nation on the first page of the report what percentage of “the national disease burden” they form – which is what the CMO does, lumping all mental health issues together. It would be considered inexcusably insensitive.

Coping with mental illness can include feelings of self-blame, inadequacy and failure. It did for me, and does for many people I know. The economic commoditisation of human pain is dangerously close to victim-blaming. Such an approach can send the destructive message: see how much money you cost everyone, you broken person? Its dark heart is that the state’s only interest in its citizens is as economic units, occasionally broken and in need of quick and efficient repair, in order to slot back into the corporate design.

11:01 am, normallydistributed
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pubhealth:

In Venezuela, doctor flees after being accused of terrorism amid fever outbreak
By Lizzie Wade
23 September 2014
Eleven days after news broke that an unknown disease had killed eight people in the city of Maracay, Venezuela, doctors have concluded that the deaths were caused by chikungunya, a mosquito-borne virus. Meanwhile, Ángel Sarmiento, the doctor who first announced the deaths, has fled the country after being accused of terrorism by President Nicolás Maduro.


Although officials initially speculated that the deaths were caused by an unknown hemorrhagic fever, six of the eight original fatalities tested positive for chikungunya when samples were analyzed in nongovernmental labs, says Julio Castro, the health minister of the municipality of Sucre and a professor in the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV). “We don’t think these deaths are due to an unknown or rare disease,” he told ScienceInsider, adding that “I have no doubt” that chikungunya is responsible.
After arriving in the Caribbean late last year, chikungunya has been sweeping the Americas. As of 19 September, the Pan-American Health Organization reported 729,178 suspected and 9537 confirmed cases in the region. There is no vaccine or cure for the disease, which is similar to dengue fever and causes joint pain. It is fatal in about one in 1000 cases.
Maracay’s cluster of nine fatalities, reported between 30 August and 15 September, has raised questions about exactly how many people are infected. The deadly cases are “the tip of the iceberg,” Castro believes. In a press conference on Monday, Castro and two other health professionals—Gustavo Villasmil, health minister of the state of Miranda, and Manuel Olivares, a doctor at UCV’s hospital—estimated that between 65,000 and 117,000 people in Venezuela are infected with chikungunya. They reached that figure by using World Health Organization standards for calculating the spread of epidemics. But it is dramatically higher than the official tallies released by Venezuela’s federal health ministry, which recognizes just 398 cases of chikungunya and three deaths.
Many infectious diseases, including malaria and dengue, are on the rise in Venezuela, where the public health system has been crippled by a lack of funds and medicine (including antifever drugs that can help treat the symptoms of chikungunya). Sarmiento’s comments about the deaths in Maracay appear to have been the straw that broke the camel’s back when it came to criticism of the government’s public health record, Villasmil says. Now facing prosecution, Sarmiento fled to an undisclosed location in Central America. Villasmil and Castro remain in Venezuela but have left their homes after participating in the press conference, as a precaution against retaliation.
(From Science)

pubhealth:

In Venezuela, doctor flees after being accused of terrorism amid fever outbreak

Although officials initially speculated that the deaths were caused by an unknown hemorrhagic fever, six of the eight original fatalities tested positive for chikungunya when samples were analyzed in nongovernmental labs, says Julio Castro, the health minister of the municipality of Sucre and a professor in the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV). “We don’t think these deaths are due to an unknown or rare disease,” he told ScienceInsider, adding that “I have no doubt” that chikungunya is responsible.

After arriving in the Caribbean late last year, chikungunya has been sweeping the Americas. As of 19 September, the Pan-American Health Organization reported 729,178 suspected and 9537 confirmed cases in the region. There is no vaccine or cure for the disease, which is similar to dengue fever and causes joint pain. It is fatal in about one in 1000 cases.

Maracay’s cluster of nine fatalities, reported between 30 August and 15 September, has raised questions about exactly how many people are infected. The deadly cases are “the tip of the iceberg,” Castro believes. In a press conference on Monday, Castro and two other health professionals—Gustavo Villasmil, health minister of the state of Miranda, and Manuel Olivares, a doctor at UCV’s hospital—estimated that between 65,000 and 117,000 people in Venezuela are infected with chikungunya. They reached that figure by using World Health Organization standards for calculating the spread of epidemics. But it is dramatically higher than the official tallies released by Venezuela’s federal health ministry, which recognizes just 398 cases of chikungunya and three deaths.

Many infectious diseases, including malaria and dengue, are on the rise in Venezuela, where the public health system has been crippled by a lack of funds and medicine (including antifever drugs that can help treat the symptoms of chikungunya). Sarmiento’s comments about the deaths in Maracay appear to have been the straw that broke the camel’s back when it came to criticism of the government’s public health record, Villasmil says. Now facing prosecution, Sarmiento fled to an undisclosed location in Central America. Villasmil and Castro remain in Venezuela but have left their homes after participating in the press conference, as a precaution against retaliation.

(From Science)


11:00 am, normallydistributed
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allheartcare:

The Battle Against Tobacco Rages On

In 1964, the first Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health made it clear — smoking causes cancer. This news hit the country like a bombshell. At the time, more than 40 percent of American adults smoked, and smoking was widely accepted and considered normal behavior.

Today, 50 years later, we’ve cut the US smoking rate by more than half. Increasingly, effective tobacco control efforts have prevented at least eight million Americans from dying prematurely.
It’s a great public health success, one of the biggest of the 20th century.
But the battle against tobacco is far from over. At least 5.6 million kids alive today will die prematurely from smoking if current rates continue. This map shows how many will die in each state.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tom-frieden-md-mph/the-battle-against-tobacc_b_4597624.html

allheartcare:

The Battle Against Tobacco Rages On

In 1964, the first Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health made it clear — smoking causes cancer. This news hit the country like a bombshell. At the time, more than 40 percent of American adults smoked, and smoking was widely accepted and considered normal behavior.

Today, 50 years later, we’ve cut the US smoking rate by more than half. Increasingly, effective tobacco control efforts have prevented at least eight million Americans from dying prematurely.

It’s a great public health success, one of the biggest of the 20th century.

But the battle against tobacco is far from over. At least 5.6 million kids alive today will die prematurely from smoking if current rates continue. This map shows how many will die in each state.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tom-frieden-md-mph/the-battle-against-tobacc_b_4597624.html


11:00 am, normallydistributed
text
20 ‘Fun’ Facts about Moi

Just because this seems to be the number one question I get in my ask box so…Here you go. 

  1. Was born in Louisiana but have lived all over the United States.
  2. I am a mix of Irish, French, Canadian, and Cajun
  3. I am by definition an extrovert but do value some alone time
  4. The only place I have truly felt at home was when I lived in Washington, DC and I really miss living in New York City
  5.  I have survived 4 hurricanes, 3 tropical storms and just missed a tornado
  6. Number 5, I openly volunteered for one of them
  7. I have a bachelors degree in Public Health that developed into a passion for statistics, policy and infectious disease
  8. Just started my Masters Degree in Public Policy
  9.  I’m the first in all of the generations of my family to get a college education.
  10. I’m about less than one month out from becoming very happily divorced
  11. I tend to over analyze everything - like everything
  12. Number 10 makes it hard for me to enjoy going to the movies
  13. I have never been issued a ticket for parking or speeding
  14.  I have a first degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do
  15. I have traveled to 13 countries, 33 states, but have never been on the US West Coast
  16. I have a deep fear of spiders
  17. I am a super organized person and have to have my days planned out
  18. I have an amazing four year old daughter who just started K4 this year
  19. I cannot survive mornings without a cup of coffee
  20. I enjoy spending time outdoors and need to relearn how to ride a bike


08:23 am, normallydistributed
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nprglobalhealth:

WATCH: The Boy Who Danced In The Face Of Ebola

This week has been tough. Maybe the toughest in the long, drawn-out battle against Ebola in West Africa.

Cases are rising at an exponential rate. Families don’t have any place to take sick loved ones. And researchers now say the epidemic could last for a 1 1/2 years.

But then at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, a little nugget of joy and hope came through my email: a 55-second video of Mamadee dancing (and dancing quite well).

According to Doctors Without Border, Mamadee was diagnosed with Ebola at a treatment center in Foya, Liberia, where only about a third of people have survived.

The 11-year-old boy had to stay in isolation for more than two weeks. And he lost his sister to Ebola during that time.

But he never stopped dancing.

Continue reading.

Video Credit: Doctors Without Borders/MSF-USA/YouTube


08:22 am, normallydistributed
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mapsontheweb:

Homicide Rate of Female Victims, 1999-2011, by state in USA with demographics

mapsontheweb:

Homicide Rate of Female Victims, 1999-2011, by state in USA with demographics

(Source: reddit.com)


08:22 am, normallydistributed
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nprglobalhealth:

Ebola Battlers Can Learn From Venice’s Response To Black Death
Patients “driven to frenzy by the disease, especially at night … went here and there, colliding with one another and suddenly falling to the ground dead.”
No, it’s not a scene from the modern-day Ebola outbreak. It’s a description from Venice of a hospital ward during the plague that first struck the city in the mid-1300s.
The city fathers didn’t understand what they were up against. And that’s precisely why Venice’s response to the plague crisis serves as a model for modern cities and nations facing unpredictable threats. That’s the perspective of several experts on risk management who write on Venice’s response in the latest issue of the journalEnvironment Systems and Decisions
Venice, as an international trade center, was especially vulnerable to the Black Death. And it was especially innovative in devising responses to the disease.
Venice established what’s often considered to be the first quarantine hospital, or lazaretto, in 1432. (The word quarantine derives from the Italian for “forty,” as in forty days of isolation.) The lazaretto sat on an island in the Venetian Lagoon and was “so big that from afar it resembles a castle,” according to an observer. It could seem, as another writer put it, like “hell itself,” with “groans and sighs … without ceasing,” not to mention “foul odors [and] clouds of smoke from the burning of corpses.”
Continue reading.
Photo: Venetians celebrate during the Festa del Redentore in Venice. The festival began in 1576 when the Republic’s Senate voted to build a church on the Giudecca Island to Christ the Redeemer to thank God for the city’s deliverance from the Plague. (Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)

nprglobalhealth:

Ebola Battlers Can Learn From Venice’s Response To Black Death

Patients “driven to frenzy by the disease, especially at night … went here and there, colliding with one another and suddenly falling to the ground dead.”

No, it’s not a scene from the modern-day Ebola outbreak. It’s a description from Venice of a hospital ward during the plague that first struck the city in the mid-1300s.

The city fathers didn’t understand what they were up against. And that’s precisely why Venice’s response to the plague crisis serves as a model for modern cities and nations facing unpredictable threats. That’s the perspective of several experts on risk management who write on Venice’s response in the latest issue of the journalEnvironment Systems and Decisions

Venice, as an international trade center, was especially vulnerable to the Black Death. And it was especially innovative in devising responses to the disease.

Venice established what’s often considered to be the first quarantine hospital, or lazaretto, in 1432. (The word quarantine derives from the Italian for “forty,” as in forty days of isolation.) The lazaretto sat on an island in the Venetian Lagoon and was “so big that from afar it resembles a castle,” according to an observer. It could seem, as another writer put it, like “hell itself,” with “groans and sighs … without ceasing,” not to mention “foul odors [and] clouds of smoke from the burning of corpses.”

Continue reading.

Photo: Venetians celebrate during the Festa del Redentore in Venice. The festival began in 1576 when the Republic’s Senate voted to build a church on the Giudecca Island to Christ the Redeemer to thank God for the city’s deliverance from the Plague. (Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)