12:16 am, normallydistributed
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mizzchelle:

17yr:

"the future belongs to the few of us still willing to get our hands dirty"

AMEN

I second this

mizzchelle:

17yr:

"the future belongs to the few of us still willing to get our hands dirty"

AMEN

I second this


09:47 am, normallydistributed
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text

Please stop and take a moment to send some positives vibes and thoughts to all of our women and men who have volunteered or are serving in West Africa and also those working on this issue here in the United States right now.

This isn’t going to be an easy battle, but it can be won and they are the heroes of this outbreak.


11:16 am, normallydistributed
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pubhealth:

The Exercise Cost of Soda and Juice
When people think about sugar calories in terms of physical activity, they choose well.
By James Hamblin 

What if nutrition labels told people exactly what calories meant, in practical terms? A bottle of Coke could dole out specific exercise requirements. The calories herein, it might say, are the equivalent of a 50-minute jog. The decision to drink the Coke then becomes, would you rather spend the evening on a treadmill, or just not drink the soda?
Some would say that’s a joyless, infantilizing idea. The implication that people can’t understand calorie counts is unduly cynical. Have a Coke and a smile, not a Coke and a guilt-wail. Others would protest on grounds that it’s impossible to make this kind of exercise requirement universal to people of all ages, body sizes, and levels of fitness. Everyone burns calories at different rates. But Sara Bleich, an associate professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, is not among these people. She describes these labels as her dream.
For the past four years, translating nutrition information into exercise equivalents has been the focus of Bleich’s increasingly popular research endeavor. Her latest findings on the effectiveness of the concept are published today in the American Journal of Public Health. In the study, researchers posted signs next to the soda and juice in Baltimore corner stores that read: “Did you know that working off a bottle of soda or fruit juice takes about 50 minutes of running?” or “Did you know that working off a bottle of soda or fruit juice takes about five miles of walking?” (And, long as those distances and times may seem, they may even underestimate the magnitude of the metabolic insult of liquid sugar.)
The signs were a proxy for an actual food label, but they made the point. They effectively led to fewer juice and soda purchases, and to purchases of smaller sizes (12-ounce cans instead of 20-ounce bottles). Bleich also saw learned behavior; even after the signs came down, the local patrons continued to buy less soda and juice.
"The problem with calories is that they’re not very meaningful to people," Bleich told me. "The average American doesn’t know much about calories, and they’re not good at numeracy."
(More from The Atlantic)

pubhealth:

The Exercise Cost of Soda and Juice

When people think about sugar calories in terms of physical activity, they choose well.

12:47 pm, normallydistributed
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I’m really starting to believe that we as a nation are far to quick to want to place blame on someone or something. Instead of just looking at the issue as an opportunity to learn and progress in (this is how science works people), we have to point fingers and call for their demise.

My second thought on this issue…
We as Americans do panic really, really well.

12:42 pm, normallydistributed
link
As Ebola fears spread, American Airlines flight crew shuts sick Texas passenger in lavatory

And so it begins…


12:40 pm, normallydistributed
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The media is doing an awful job explaining Ebola, and #ClipboardMan is proof

Can’t believe that this is real!


12:36 pm, normallydistributed
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publichealthmemes:


When I see another news anchor over-hyping Ebola

publichealthmemes:

When I see another news anchor over-hyping Ebola


09:19 am, normallydistributed
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photoset

think-progress:

"I always had a feeling I was a walking time bomb, and it turned out I was right. If it hadn’t been for gaining insurance and being able to go to the doctor, I might not be here."

Meet the people whose lives have been transformed by Medicaid expansion.


11:25 pm, normallydistributed
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nprglobalhealth:

NPR’s Nurith Aizenman visited a former U.S. Army base in Alabama that’s been rigged to look just like an Ebola treatment center in West Africa. The base is where the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is running a training program for clinicians headed to Ebola-stricken countries. The course runs three days every week through January with about 35 students per session.
And the curriculum? Lots of detailed instructions on how to put on and take off the personal protective gear medical workers must wear, of course.
Take a peek at the syllabus: Lessons From Ebola School: How To Draw Blood, Wipe Up Vomit

nprglobalhealth:

NPR’s Nurith Aizenman visited a former U.S. Army base in Alabama that’s been rigged to look just like an Ebola treatment center in West Africa. The base is where the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is running a training program for clinicians headed to Ebola-stricken countries. The course runs three days every week through January with about 35 students per session.

And the curriculum? Lots of detailed instructions on how to put on and take off the personal protective gear medical workers must wear, of course.

Take a peek at the syllabus: Lessons From Ebola School: How To Draw Blood, Wipe Up Vomit


12:37 pm, normallydistributed
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publichealthmemes:


But that’s none of my business


THIS!

publichealthmemes:

But that’s none of my business

THIS!