07:30 pm, normallydistributed
reblogged
56 notes
picture HD
nprglobalhealth:

Could A 2-Year-Old Boy Be ‘Patient Zero’ For The Ebola Outbreak?
Back in early December, a little boy in southern Guinea caught a mysterious disease. He had a fever, was vomiting and had blood in his stool.
The boy died a few days later. Before he did, he passed the disease to his 3-year-old sister, his mother, his grandmother and a midwife. The latter was eventually hospitalized in Gueckedou, a nearby city of 200,000 people.
By March, the disease spread to four cities. And international health officials realized they had an Ebola outbreak on their hands. The virus quickly spilled over into Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria. Now more 1,400 have died in the outbreak, the World Health Organization says.
Back in April, an international team of scientists reported in The New England Journal of Medicine that this little boy, just 2 years old, likely triggered the entire Ebola outbreak in Guinea.
Some called the boy “patient zero.” But others think his story offers insights to how the outbreak grew so fast.
Continue reading.

nprglobalhealth:

Could A 2-Year-Old Boy Be ‘Patient Zero’ For The Ebola Outbreak?

Back in early December, a little boy in southern Guinea caught a mysterious disease. He had a fever, was vomiting and had blood in his stool.

The boy died a few days later. Before he did, he passed the disease to his 3-year-old sister, his mother, his grandmother and a midwife. The latter was eventually hospitalized in Gueckedou, a nearby city of 200,000 people.

By March, the disease spread to four cities. And international health officials realized they had an Ebola outbreak on their hands. The virus quickly spilled over into Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria. Now more 1,400 have died in the outbreak, the World Health Organization says.

Back in April, an international team of scientists reported in The New England Journal of Medicine that this little boy, just 2 years old, likely triggered the entire Ebola outbreak in Guinea.

Some called the boy “patient zero.” But others think his story offers insights to how the outbreak grew so fast.

Continue reading.


07:29 pm, normallydistributed
reblogged
93 notes
picture HD
think-progress:

“Fully combating climate change is going to require women’s full empowerment everywhere.”
544 young women want to tell the UN about the urgency of climate change.

think-progress:

“Fully combating climate change is going to require women’s full empowerment everywhere.”

544 young women want to tell the UN about the urgency of climate change.


09:24 pm, normallydistributed
reblogged
30 notes
link
The next pandemic won’t erupt from the rainforest – Wendy Orent – Aeon

heyyouyesyou:

Just what I like to read about at work while waiting on the copy desk: the history of plagues.


09:09 am, normallydistributed
reblogged
51 notes
link
The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

infectioushealth:

Thanks Washington Post on writing about everything that made me question the Newsweek’s cover story, “Smuggled bushmeat is Ebola’s Back Door.” I only put Newsweek’s link so you can read how ignorant some people are about this disease. 

Two main things: 

  1. Bushmeat = wild game. 
  2. Fruit bats, NOT chimpanzees, are thought to be the reservoir for Ebola.

That is all. 


11:58 pm, normallydistributed
text
First Human Trials of Ebola Vaccine to Start

The U.S. government and drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline will announce Thursday that they are starting the first human trials of a vaccine against the deadly Ebola virus.

The National Institutes of Health will sponsor the first trial of the vaccine, one of several being developed against Ebola. It’s fast-tracked the testing because of the outbreak of Ebola that is ravaging three West African countries.

NIH plans to release more details Thursday, a spokesman told NBC News.

Read More


11:51 pm, normallydistributed
reblogged
23 notes
picture
pubhealth:


Looking for a Career in Public Health Program Management?
The Public Health Prevention Service (PHPS) is seeking enthusiastic people for a three-year training and service fellowship. Are you interested in
Improving your public health leadership and management skills?
Gaining hands-on experience?
Working in a public health agency?
Designed for master’s level public health professionals, the PHPS fellowship focuses on public health program management and provides experience in program planning, implementation, and evaluation through specialized hands-on training and mentorship at CDC, as well as in state, local, and other public health organizations.
Learn more about the fellowship.
(From CDC)

pubhealth:

image

Looking for a Career in Public Health Program Management?

The Public Health Prevention Service (PHPS) is seeking enthusiastic people for a three-year training and service fellowship. Are you interested in

  • Improving your public health leadership and management skills?
  • Gaining hands-on experience?
  • Working in a public health agency?

Designed for master’s level public health professionals, the PHPS fellowship focuses on public health program management and provides experience in program planning, implementation, and evaluation through specialized hands-on training and mentorship at CDC, as well as in state, local, and other public health organizations.

Learn more about the fellowship.

(From CDC)


11:50 pm, normallydistributed
reblogged
176 notes
picture HD
nycgov:

Did you know nearly half of the 14 million new HPV infections each year occur among 15-24 year-olds? Prevent HPV-related cancer today. Ask your preteen or teen’s doctor about the HPV vaccine: http://on.nyc.gov/1rrxcLP #VaccinateHPV
nychealth:

Prevent Cancer Today: #VaccinateHPV!
About 79 million people in the U.S. have human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and another 14 million get HPV each year.  Who should get vaccinated and why?
HPV infection can cause genital warts and can lead to cancer many years later
Each year, there are approximately 33,200 HPV-associated cancers in the U.S. – about 20,600 in women and 12,600 in men. HPV cancers include cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancers.
Early vaccination and prevention is critical for cancer prevention, which is why it is especially important for parents to take control and bring their pre-teens and teens to the doctor to receive the vaccine.
The best way to prevent HPV is with a vaccine, which may be up to 99% effective in preventing these cancers.
The vaccine is recommended for all girls and boys between the ages of 11 and 12. It is important to vaccinate your child now, before he or she is old enough to be exposed to HPV. The vaccine may be given to pre-teens as young as 9.
Females aged 13 through 26 and males aged 13 through 21 should be vaccinated if they have not previously received the vaccine.
Men who have sex with men, who are at greater risk for HPV infection, and men with weak immune systems (including those who have HIV/AIDS) aged 22 through 26 should also receive the HPV vaccine.
The vaccine is safe!
Nearly 67 million doses of HPV vaccine have been given in the U.S. through March 2014, and studies provide continued evidence of the vaccine’s safety. The most common side-effects are mild, temporary symptoms, including soreness where the shot was given and fever, headache and nausea.
Save yourself an additional trip to the doctor!
The HPV vaccine is safe to receive with the other recommended adolescent vaccines. Many children also see health care professionals for physicals before school or for participation in sports, camping events, travel and so on. These are all great opportunities for your preteen or teen to get the HPV vaccine.
Visit our HPV page to learn more & ask your child’s provider about the HPV vaccine today!

nycgov:

Did you know nearly half of the 14 million new HPV infections each year occur among 15-24 year-olds? Prevent HPV-related cancer today. Ask your preteen or teen’s doctor about the HPV vaccine: http://on.nyc.gov/1rrxcLP #VaccinateHPV

nychealth:

Prevent Cancer Today: #VaccinateHPV!

About 79 million people in the U.S. have human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and another 14 million get HPV each year.  Who should get vaccinated and why?

HPV infection can cause genital warts and can lead to cancer many years later

  • Each year, there are approximately 33,200 HPV-associated cancers in the U.S. – about 20,600 in women and 12,600 in men. HPV cancers include cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancers.
  • Early vaccination and prevention is critical for cancer prevention, which is why it is especially important for parents to take control and bring their pre-teens and teens to the doctor to receive the vaccine.

The best way to prevent HPV is with a vaccine, which may be up to 99% effective in preventing these cancers.

  • The vaccine is recommended for all girls and boys between the ages of 11 and 12. It is important to vaccinate your child now, before he or she is old enough to be exposed to HPV. The vaccine may be given to pre-teens as young as 9.
  • Females aged 13 through 26 and males aged 13 through 21 should be vaccinated if they have not previously received the vaccine.
  • Men who have sex with men, who are at greater risk for HPV infection, and men with weak immune systems (including those who have HIV/AIDS) aged 22 through 26 should also receive the HPV vaccine.

The vaccine is safe!

  • Nearly 67 million doses of HPV vaccine have been given in the U.S. through March 2014, and studies provide continued evidence of the vaccine’s safety. The most common side-effects are mild, temporary symptoms, including soreness where the shot was given and fever, headache and nausea.

Save yourself an additional trip to the doctor!

  • The HPV vaccine is safe to receive with the other recommended adolescent vaccines. Many children also see health care professionals for physicals before school or for participation in sports, camping events, travel and so on. These are all great opportunities for your preteen or teen to get the HPV vaccine.

Visit our HPV page to learn more & ask your child’s provider about the HPV vaccine today!


11:48 pm, normallydistributed
reblogged
31 notes
picture HD
likelyhealthy:

I’m going to bring this infographic EVERYWHERE with me.

likelyhealthy:

I’m going to bring this infographic EVERYWHERE with me.


07:41 pm, normallydistributed
9 notes
text
CDC Director On Ebola: ‘We Are Definitely Not At The Peak’

On Monday, Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, arrived in Liberia to assess the Ebola outbreak. The situation “is overwhelming,” he said.

The outbreak “really is a crisis and is affecting most if not all the counties in Liberia already,” he told NPR from Monrovia, the capital city and first stop on a three-country visit. “This is absolutely unprecedented.”

Read More

(Source: NPR)


07:31 pm, normallydistributed
reblogged
11 notes
picture HD
publichealthrn:

August is National Immunization Awareness Month!
Before you go back to school or work, make sure you & your loved ones are up to date on vaccinations. 

publichealthrn:

August is National Immunization Awareness Month!

Before you go back to school or work, make sure you & your loved ones are up to date on vaccinations. 

(Source: mizzchelle)