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Obama To Send 3,000 Military Forces To Fight Ebola In West Africa

The Obama administration is ramping up its response to West Africa’s Ebola crisis, preparing to assign 3,000 U.S. military personnel to the afflicted region to supply medical and logistical support to overwhelmed local health care systems and to boost the number of beds needed to isolate and treat victims of the epidemic.

President Barack Obama planned to announce the stepped-up effort Tuesday during a visit to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta amid alarm that the outbreak could spread and that the deadly virus could mutate into a more easily transmitted disease.

Read More Here

Global Health Response


09:09 am, normallydistributed
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Dr. Olivet Buck Dies in Sierra Leone After WHO Denies Funds for Evacuation

Sierra Leone has lost a fourth doctor to Ebola after a failed effort to transfer her abroad for medical treatment, a government official said Sunday, a huge setback to the impoverished country that is battling the virulent disease amid a shortage of health care workers. Dr. Olivet Buck died late Saturday, hours after the World Health Organization said it could not help medically evacuate her to Germany, Chief Medical Officer Dr. Brima Kargbo confirmed to The Associated Press. Sierra Leone had requested funds from WHO to transport Buck to Europe, saying the country could not afford to lose another doctor.

WHO had said that it could not meet the request but instead would work to give Buck “the best care possible” in Sierra Leone, including possible access to experimental drugs. Ebola is spread through direct contact with the bodily fluids of sick patients, making doctors and nurses especially vulnerable to contracting the virus that has no vaccine or approved treatment. More than 300 health workers have become infected with Ebola in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Nearly half of them have died, according to WHO.

(Source: nbcnews.com)


06:59 pm, normallydistributed
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publichealthmemes:


More states announcing enterovirus D68 cases?

publichealthmemes:

More states announcing enterovirus D68 cases?


11:02 am, normallydistributed
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pubhealth:

NOVA
Vaccines Calling The Shots


Diseases that were largely eradicated in the United States a generation ago—whooping cough, measles, mumps—are returning, in part because nervous parents are skipping their children’s shots. NOVA’s “Vaccines—Calling the Shots” takes viewers around the world to track epidemics, explore the science behind vaccinations, hear from parents wrestling with vaccine-related questions, and shed light on the risks of opting out.
Aired on Wed. Sep. 10th. You can watch it here
(From NOVA-PBS)

pubhealth:

NOVA

Vaccines Calling The Shots

Diseases that were largely eradicated in the United States a generation ago—whooping cough, measles, mumps—are returning, in part because nervous parents are skipping their children’s shots. NOVA’s “Vaccines—Calling the Shots” takes viewers around the world to track epidemics, explore the science behind vaccinations, hear from parents wrestling with vaccine-related questions, and shed light on the risks of opting out.

Aired on Wed. Sep. 10th. You can watch it here

(From NOVA-PBS)


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nprglobalhealth:

How Do You Catch Ebola: By Air, Sweat Or Water?
There’s no question Ebola is one of the most terrifying diseases out there. It causes a painful death, typically kills more than 50 percent of those infected and essentially has no cure.
But if you compare how contagious the Ebola virus is to, say SARS or the measles, Ebola just doesn’t stack up. In fact, the virus is harder to catch than the common cold.
That’s because there has been no evidence that Ebola spreads between people through the air. Health experts repeatedly emphasize that human-to-human transmission requires direct contact with infected bodily fluids, including blood, vomit and feces.
And to infect, those fluids have to reach a break in the skin or the mucous membranes found around your eyes, mouth and nose.
But that hasn’t stopped two-thirds of Americans from thinking that the virus spreads “easily,” a poll from Harvard School of Public Health found in August. Almost 40 percent of the 1,025 people surveyed said they worry about an Ebola epidemic in the U.S. More than a quarter were concerned about catching the virus themselves.
Many questions still linger. Is Ebola really not airborne? Can it spread through contaminated water? What about through a drop of blood left behind on a table?
So we took those questions to two virologists: Alan Schmaljohn at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and Jean-Paul Gonzalez at Metabiota, a company that tracks global infectious diseases.
Continue reading.
Photo: A burial team in Barkedu, Liberia, buries their protective clothing alongside the body of an Ebola victim. It’s possible to catch the virus from clothing soiled by infected blood or other bodily fluids. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)

nprglobalhealth:

How Do You Catch Ebola: By Air, Sweat Or Water?

There’s no question Ebola is one of the most terrifying diseases out there. It causes a painful death, typically kills more than 50 percent of those infected and essentially has no cure.

But if you compare how contagious the Ebola virus is to, say SARS or the measles, Ebola just doesn’t stack up. In fact, the virus is harder to catch than the common cold.

That’s because there has been no evidence that Ebola spreads between people through the air. Health experts repeatedly emphasize that human-to-human transmission requires direct contact with infected bodily fluids, including blood, vomit and feces.

And to infect, those fluids have to reach a break in the skin or the mucous membranes found around your eyes, mouth and nose.

But that hasn’t stopped two-thirds of Americans from thinking that the virus spreads “easily,” a poll from Harvard School of Public Health found in August. Almost 40 percent of the 1,025 people surveyed said they worry about an Ebola epidemic in the U.S. More than a quarter were concerned about catching the virus themselves.

Many questions still linger. Is Ebola really not airborne? Can it spread through contaminated water? What about through a drop of blood left behind on a table?

So we took those questions to two virologists: Alan Schmaljohn at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and Jean-Paul Gonzalez at Metabiota, a company that tracks global infectious diseases.

Continue reading.

Photo: A burial team in Barkedu, Liberia, buries their protective clothing alongside the body of an Ebola victim. It’s possible to catch the virus from clothing soiled by infected blood or other bodily fluids. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)


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nprglobalhealth:

American Fighting Ebola Receives Blood Transfusion From Survivor
The third American aid worker to catch Ebola in West Africa has been given two experimental treatments, doctors said Thursday. One of those therapies came from the blood of another American who recently recovered from Ebola.
Last Friday, Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, was flown to Omaha, Neb., in a special medevac plane after he caught Ebola in Liberia. The family doctor had been working at a maternity ward in the country’s capital, Monrovia, when he got sick.
Of the three countries most affected by the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, Liberia has been hit the hardest. The country has reported more than 2,000 cases and about 1,200 deaths, the World Health Organization said Monday.
When Sacra arrived at the Nebraska Medical Center, doctors said he was in stable condition. The next day, doctors gave Sacra blood plasma from Dr. Kent Brantly — another American aid worker who caught Ebola in Liberia.
Brantly was treated for Ebola at a hospital in Atlanta back in August. Doctors gave him and his co-worker, Nancy Writebol, the experimental drug ZMapp. Both of them recovered from Ebola. But it still isn’t known whether ZMapp helped them. So far, the drug has been tested only in monkeys.
The idea is that Brantly’s blood contains Ebola antibodies, which could help Sacra’s immune system fight off the virus.
Continue reading.
Photo: Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, has been working on and off in Liberia for 15 years. He went back to Monrovia in August to help deliver babies. It’s still unknown how he caught Ebola. (Courtesy of SIM)

nprglobalhealth:

American Fighting Ebola Receives Blood Transfusion From Survivor

The third American aid worker to catch Ebola in West Africa has been given two experimental treatments, doctors said Thursday. One of those therapies came from the blood of another American who recently recovered from Ebola.

Last Friday, Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, was flown to Omaha, Neb., in a special medevac plane after he caught Ebola in Liberia. The family doctor had been working at a maternity ward in the country’s capital, Monrovia, when he got sick.

Of the three countries most affected by the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, Liberia has been hit the hardest. The country has reported more than 2,000 cases and about 1,200 deaths, the World Health Organization said Monday.

When Sacra arrived at the Nebraska Medical Center, doctors said he was in stable condition. The next day, doctors gave Sacra blood plasma from Dr. Kent Brantly — another American aid worker who caught Ebola in Liberia.

Brantly was treated for Ebola at a hospital in Atlanta back in August. Doctors gave him and his co-worker, Nancy Writebol, the experimental drug ZMapp. Both of them recovered from Ebola. But it still isn’t known whether ZMapp helped them. So far, the drug has been tested only in monkeys.

The idea is that Brantly’s blood contains Ebola antibodies, which could help Sacra’s immune system fight off the virus.

Continue reading.

Photo: Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, has been working on and off in Liberia for 15 years. He went back to Monrovia in August to help deliver babies. It’s still unknown how he caught Ebola. (Courtesy of SIM)


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Missouri Lawmakers Just Enacted A 72-Hour Abortion Waiting Period With No Rape Exception
My head hurts reading this. SMH

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globalpost:

GlobalPost’s Heather Horn writes:

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — Zebiba, 28, sits in her purple headscarf in the small clinic room, the cramping already beginning. She took the tablets early this morning. She is three months pregnant.

By 2 p.m., her abortion should be complete. She will return to her two children, now at school. She is divorcing their father, who has taken a second wife.

Thus far, she has refused pain medications. Her relief at the ease of this termination is palpable. “She was nervous coming here,” says the nurse.

A generation ago, botched abortions were the single biggest contributor to Ethiopia’s sky-high maternal mortality rate. Doctors in the largest public hospital in Addis Ababa, where Zebiba lives, still remember the time when three-quarters of the beds in the maternal ward were reserved purely for complications from such procedures.

Then, in 2005, the country liberalized its abortion law.

Today, it’s hard to find a health provider who’s seen more than one abortion-related death in the past five years. Although access to safe procedures and high quality care could still be expanded, doctors say that, increasingly, those who need an abortion can get one safely.

Read the full piece here: How Ethiopia solved its abortion problem

Photos by Heather Horn/GlobalPost


11:44 pm, normallydistributed
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Cuts at WHO Hurt Ebola Response

pocketglobalhealth:

Link above to the NY Times


11:43 pm, normallydistributed
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nprglobalhealth:

Nepal Struggles To Help Villages Washed Away In Floods
In August, monsoon rains brought flooding and landslides to Nepal on a massive scale.
Three days of constant rains inundated valleys. And huge swaths of land came tumbling down mountainsides in the western part of the country.
At one point, the lower portion of the Surkhet Valley — a lush river basin 30 miles wide — flooded up to 15 feet deep. Police patrolled the valley in a motorboat as if it were a lake.
More than 6,000 people have lost their homes in Surkhet District alone, the Nepal government estimates. Schools, roads and entire villages were washed away. Nearly 150 people are dead or missing.
As in many disasters, the poorest and most vulnerable people were hurt the most. In the capital of the district, almost all of the destroyed homes were in the slum neighborhoods — where people already struggle to get enough food each day. Now where homes stood, there are crumbled brick walls, stretches with just a pile of rocks or a few lonely columns.
Displaced families are living in schools, empty government buildings, open fields or in the forest. The International Red Cross and the local government have taken the lead in providing emergency aid, with the help of other NGOs.
Continue reading.
Photo: The heaviest rainfall occurred in the Surkhet District in the western part of Nepal. (Hannah Marqusee for NPR)

nprglobalhealth:

Nepal Struggles To Help Villages Washed Away In Floods

In August, monsoon rains brought flooding and landslides to Nepal on a massive scale.

Three days of constant rains inundated valleys. And huge swaths of land came tumbling down mountainsides in the western part of the country.

At one point, the lower portion of the Surkhet Valley — a lush river basin 30 miles wide — flooded up to 15 feet deep. Police patrolled the valley in a motorboat as if it were a lake.

More than 6,000 people have lost their homes in Surkhet District alone, the Nepal government estimates. Schools, roads and entire villages were washed away. Nearly 150 people are dead or missing.

As in many disasters, the poorest and most vulnerable people were hurt the most. In the capital of the district, almost all of the destroyed homes were in the slum neighborhoods — where people already struggle to get enough food each day. Now where homes stood, there are crumbled brick walls, stretches with just a pile of rocks or a few lonely columns.

Displaced families are living in schools, empty government buildings, open fields or in the forest. The International Red Cross and the local government have taken the lead in providing emergency aid, with the help of other NGOs.

Continue reading.

Photo: The heaviest rainfall occurred in the Surkhet District in the western part of Nepal. (Hannah Marqusee for NPR)